Friday, 11 September 2009

Frontgate Bedside Fire Alarm and Clock Large Clock Display, 90-dB Alarm, 7-Day Battery Backup

Are you worried about falling asleep and being burned alive by a house
fire because you failed to hear your fire alarms? I know I am and so are
the product managers over at Frontgate (supposedly Outfitting America's
Finest Homes ). One of their latest product introductions, the Bedside
Fire Alarm and Clock is sure to have paranoid pyrophobes sleeping a bit
easier at night.

The Frontgate Bedside Fire Alarm and Clock listens for your fire alarms
so you don't have do worry about your REM hearing acuity. Once it has
detected that your alarms are going off it emits its own 90-dB alarm
sound to alert you that you and all of your belongings are about to
become kindling. To put that in perspective, that's somewhere between
the sound level produced by a jackhammer and a jet taking off. I think
that should about do the trick, but Frontgate thought you could use some
more security. At the same time the 90-dB alarm is going off a vibrating
device starts to shake your bed. Here are the complete specs:

Extra-loud 90 decibel signal is more effective at waking up heavy
sleepers, seniors, children, and people with hearing loss
Bed shaker can be placed under a mattress pad or pillow and
vibrates when either the emergency or wake-up alarm is activated
Large clock display shows alarm time, date, and emergency messages
Seven-day power backup requires 4 D cell alkaline batteries (included)
Works only with UL-listed smoke alarms manufactured since 1998
5.5-ft cord; 120V
The Frontgate Fire Alarm and Clock will either save you from impending
combustible doom or it will cause you to have an immediate cardiac
arrest upon hearing the alarm and having your bed shaken while you're
fast asleep. Either way, it sounds like a great invention. I would just
check to see if there is a history of heart trouble in your family tree
before buying one. You can get your own for $179 at www.frontgate.com.

Post a Comment

Analytics and Statistic

Blog Archive