Saturday, 6 April 2013

Video: WaterCar Python Amphibious Car in Action

Road going cars that are capable of taking to the water, thus being
amphibious, are nothing new, but what makes the WaterCar Python
Amphibious Car particularly impressive (aside from how much it ll set
you back " more on that later) is that it just happens to be the world
s fastest amphibious car in being capable of not only 0-60mph in a mere
4.5 seconds on the road but also being capable of powering you along at
some 60mph on the water – thus making other amphibious cars seem
decidedly sedate when on the water by comparison.
The WaterCar Python Amphibious Car, which is powered by a V8 engine
based on the aluminum LS Corvette power train offering some 640
horsepower will happily propel you on land at speeds of 100mph "
despite its 3,800lb weight, already sounds impressive enough but when
you factor in that the Python uses a Dominator Jet offering some 500
horsepower to power it through the water at speeds faster than many
speed boats you start to get a feel as to why the Python is something
particularly special.


'My vision was to see high-performance cars that were also
high-performance boats. � Said Dave March, the man behind the machine.
�But I was not interested in previous amphibious vehicles that just
float around. I was interested in designing a high-performance
automobile capable of getting to plane on top of the water, to reach
motorway-style speeds on the water. �

There s no doubt that March as indeed delivered just that, as can be
evidenced in the video below that shows the Python being put through its
paces on both land and water, but, of course, and you hardly need us to
tell you this, if you re wanting a slice of the action you ll either
need to some serious cash laying around or an enormously sympathetic
bank manager, as the Python will set you back some pound sterling125,000
(which, as at the time of writing, equates to around $199,790) " and,
lets be honest here, few would argue that its not worth every single
penny/cent.
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